Can I Beat a Urine Test?

ALEJANDRO AMADOR QUOTED ON HOW STUFF WORKS

Aliya Hoyt, a contributing writer to HowStuffWorks.com, quotes Ammon Labs’ COO Alejandro Amador in an article she published on September 22, 2017 on the methods some people use to try to pass a drug test using someone else’s urine. HowStuffWorks.com is an American commercial educational website that provides its target audience an insight into the way many things work. The site uses various media to explain complex concepts, terminology, and mechanisms—including photographs, diagrams, videos, animations, and articles. The site has almost 2 million followers on Facebook, over 129k followers on Twitter, over 88k followers on Instagram and over 500k subscribers on YouTube.

Below in italics are the sections in which Alejandro is quoted. Click here to be taken to the full article.

Alejandro Amador quoted on HowStuffWorks.com discussing the folly of trying to beat a urine test.

So, what about the other 10 percent? “In the event that a patient beats the monitoring, laboratories can use several different drug tests to determine if the urine was tampered with,” explains Alejandro Amador, chief operating officer with Ammon Labs, a full-service toxicology laboratory, in an email. He says that several specimen validity testing (SVT) tests are conducted on all urines that enter the facility. “The idea being that if specific gravity, creatinine, pH and oxidants are all normal then we can assume it is a valid urine collection. These tests can help identify substitution (apple juice, bleach etc.) and adulteration (when something is added or taken to mask drugs).”

Employment agencies and companies looking to thwart such attempts should probably look for stricter collection sites than those Tommy’s friends were sent to. “It is absolutely possible to beat a drug test using someone else’s urine. However, facilities/clinics/treatment centers can use commonly accepted collection practices to prevent this behavior,” Amador says. “It is key for drug testing facilities to develop sample tampering strategies; once their patients understand they cannot beat their drug testing they are much more likely to engage in the process towards recovery.”

2017-11-27T14:54:12+00:00